A mixin to be used by any presenter that wants to support the Hoodoo::Presenters family of schema DSL methods. See e.g. Hoodoo::Presenters::Base. Mixed in by e.g. Hoodoo::Presenters::Object so that an instance can nest definitions of fields inside itself using this DSL.

Methods
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Instance Public methods
array( name, options = {}, &block )

Define a JSON array with the supplied name and options. If there is a block provided, then more DSL calls inside the block define how each array entry must look; otherwise array entries are not validated / are undefined unless the :type option is specified (see below).

When an array uses :required => true, this only says that at least an empty array must be present, nothing more. If the array uses a block with fields that themselves are required, then this is only checked for if the array contains one or more entries (and is checked for each of those entries).

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

&block

Optional block declaring the fields of each array item

Array entries are normally either unvalidated, or describe complex types via a block. For simple fields, pass a :type option to declare that array entries must be of supported types as follows:

:array

Hoodoo::Presenters::Array (see array)

:boolean

Hoodoo::Presenters::Boolean (see boolean)

:date

Hoodoo::Presenters::Date (see date)

:date_time

Hoodoo::Presenters::DateTime (see datetime)

:decimal

Hoodoo::Presenters::Decimal (see decimal)

:enum

Hoodoo::Presenters::Enum (see enum)

:float

Hoodoo::Presenters::Float (see float)

:integer

Hoodoo::Presenters::Integer (see integer)

:string

Hoodoo::Presenters::String (see string)

:tags

Hoodoo::Presenters::Tags (see tags)

:text

Hoodoo::Presenters::Text (see text)

:uuid

Hoodoo::Presenters::UUID (see uuid)

Some of these types require additional parameters, such as :precision for Hoodoo::Presenters::Decimal or :from for Hoodoo::Presenters::Enum. For any options that are to apply to the the new Array simple type fields, prefix the option with the string field_ - for example, :field_precision => 2.

It does not make sense to attempt to apply field defaults to simple type array entries via :field_default; don't do this.

In the case of :type => :array, the declaring Array is saying that its entries are themselves individually Arrays. This means that validation will ensure and rendering will assume that each of the parent Array entries are themselves Arrays, but will not validte the child Array contents any further. It is not possible to declare an Array with a child Array that has further children, or has child-level validation; instead you would need to use the block syntax, so that the child Array was associated to some named key in the arising Object/Hash making up each of the parent entries.

Block syntax example

Mandatory JSON field “currencies” would lead to an array where each array entry contains the fields defined by Hoodoo::Data::Types::Currency along with an up-to-32 character string with field name “notes”, that field also being required. Whether or not the fields of the referenced Currency type are needed is up to the definition of that type. See type for more information.

class VeryWealthy < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    array :currencies, :required => true do
      type :Currency
      string :notes, :required => true, :length => 32
    end
  end
end

Simple type syntax without field options

An optional Array which consists of simple UUIDs as its entries:

class UUIDCollection < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    array :uuids, :type => :uuid
  end
end

# E.g.:
#
# {
#   "uuids" => [ "...uuid...", "...uuid...", ... ]
# }

Validation of data intended to be rendered through such a schema declaration would make sure that each array entry was UUID-like.

Simple type syntax with field options

An optional Array which consists of Decimals with precision 2:

class DecimalCollection < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    array :numbers, :type => :decimal, :field_precision => 2
  end
end

# E.g.:
#
# {
#   "numbers" => [ BigDecimal.new( '2.2511' ) ]
# }
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 167
def array( name, options = {}, &block )
  ary = property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Array, options, &block )
  internationalised() if ary.is_internationalised?()
end
boolean( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON boolean with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 374
def boolean( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Boolean, options )
end
date( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON date with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 383
def date( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Date, options )
end
datetime( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON datetime with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 392
def datetime( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::DateTime, options )
end
decimal( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON decimal with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true and mandatory :precision => [decimal-precision-number]

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 365
def decimal( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Decimal, options )
end
enum( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON string which can only have a restricted set of exactly matched values, with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true and mandatory :from => [array-of-allowed-strings-or-symbols]

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 414
def enum( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Enum, options )
end
float( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON float with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 355
def float( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Float, options )
end
hash( name, options = {}, &block )

Define a JSON object with the supplied name and optional constraints on properties (like hash keys) and property values (like hash values) that the object may contain, in abstract terms.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

&block

Optional block declaring the fields making up the nested hash

Block-based complex type examples

Example 1

A Hash where keys must be <= 16 characters long and values must match a Hoodoo::Data::Types::Currency type (with the default Hoodoo::Data::Types namespace use arising from the Symbol passed to the type method).

class CurrencyHash < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    hash :currencies do
      keys :length => 16 do
        type :Currency
      end
    end
  end
end

See Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash#keys for more information and examples.

Example 2

A Hash where keys must be 'one' or 'two', each with a value matching the given schema. Here, the example assumes that a subclass of Hoodoo::Presenters::Base has been defined under the name of SomeNamespace::Types::Currency, since this is passed as a class reference to the type method.

class AltCurrencyHash < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    hash :currencies do
      key :one do
        type SomeNamespace::Types::Currency
      end

      key :two do
        text :title
        text :description
      end
    end
  end
end

See Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash#key for more information and examples.

Simple types

As with array, simple types can be declared for Hash key values by passing a :type option to Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash#key or Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash#keys. See the array documentation for a list of permitted types.

For individual specific keys in Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash#key, it does make sense sometimes to specify field defaults using either a :default or :field_default key (they are synonyms). For arbitrary keys via Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash#keys the situation is the same as with array entries and it does not make sense to specify field defaults.

Simple type example

class Person < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    hash :name do
      key :first, :type => :text
      key :last,  :type => :text
    end

    hash :address do
      keys :type => :text
    end

    hash :identifiers, :required => true do
      keys :length => 8, :type => :string, :field_length => 32
    end
  end
end

The optional Hash called name has two optional keys which must be called first or last and have values that conform to Hoodoo::Presenters::Text.

The optional Hash called address has arbitrarily named unbounded length keys which where present must conform to Hoodoo::Presenters::Text.

The required Hash called identifiers hash arbitrarily named keys with a maximum length of 8 characters which must have values that conform to Hoodoo::Presenters::String and are each no more than 32 characters long.

Therefore the following payload is valid:

data = {
  "name" => {
    "first" => "Test",
    "last" => "Testy"
  },
  "address" => {
    "road" => "1 Test Street",
    "city" => "Testville",
    "post_code" => "T01 C41"
  },
  "identifiers" => {
    "primary" => "9759c77d188f4bfe85959738dc6f8505",
    "postgres" => "1442"
  }
}

Person.validate( data )
# => []

The following example contains numerous mistakes:

data = {
  "name" => {
    "first" => "Test",
    "surname" => "Testy" # Invalid key name
  },
  "address" => {
    "road" => "1 Test Street",
    "city" => "Testville",
    "zip" => 90421 # Integer, not Text
  },
  "identifiers" => {
    "primary" => "9759c77d188f4bfe85959738dc6f8505_441", # Value too long
    "postgresql" => "1442" # Key name too long
  }
}

Person.validate( data )
# => [{"code"=>"generic.invalid_hash",
#      "message"=>"Field `name` is an invalid hash due to unrecognised keys `surname`",
#      "reference"=>"name"},
#     {"code"=>"generic.invalid_string",
#      "message"=>"Field `address.zip` is an invalid string",
#      "reference"=>"address.zip"},
#     {"code"=>"generic.invalid_string",
#      "message"=>"Field `identifiers.primary` is longer than maximum length `32`",
#      "reference"=>"identifiers.primary"},
#     {"code"=>"generic.invalid_string",
#      "message"=>"Field `identifiers.postgresql` is longer than maximum length `8`",
#      "reference"=>"identifiers.postgresql"}]
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 326
def hash( name, options = {}, &block )
  hash = property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Hash, options, &block )
  internationalised() if hash.is_internationalised?()
end
integer( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON integer with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 336
def integer( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Integer, options )
end
internationalised( options = nil )

Declares that this Type or Resource contains fields which will may carry human-readable data subject to platform interntionalisation rules. A Resource which is internationalised automatically gains a language field (part of the Platform API's Common Fields) used in resource representations. A Type which is internationalised gains nothing until it is cross-referenced by a Resource definion, at which point the cross-referencing resource becomes itself implicitly internationalised (so it “taints” the resource). For cross-referencing, see type.

options

Optional options hash. No options currently defined.

Example - a Member resource with internationalised fields such as the member's name:

class Member < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do

    # Say that Member will contain at least one field that holds
    # human readable data, causing the Member to be subject to
    # internationalisation rules.

    internationalised

    # Declare fields as normal, for example...

    text :name

  end
end
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 683
def internationalised( options = nil )
  options ||= {}
  @internationalised = true
end
is_internationalised?()

An enquiry method related to, but not part of the DSL; returns true if the schema instance is internationalised, else false.

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 691
def is_internationalised?
  !! @internationalised
end
object( name, options = {}, &block )

Define a JSON object with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key.

options

Optional Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

&block

Block declaring the fields making up the nested object

Example - mandatory JSON field “currencies” would lead to an object which had the same fields as Hoodoo::Data::Types::Currency along with an up-to-32 character string with field name “notes”, that field also being required. Whether or not the fields of the referenced Currency type are needed is up to the definition of that type. See type for more information.

class Wealthy < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    object :currencies, :required => true do
      type :Currency
      string :notes, :required => true, :length => 32
    end
  end
end
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 44
def object( name, options = {}, &block )
  raise ArgumentError.new( 'Hoodoo::Presenters::Base#Object must have block' ) unless block_given?

  obj = property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Object, options, &block )
  internationalised() if obj.is_internationalised?()
end
resource( resource_info, options = nil )

Declare that a resource of a given name is included at this point. This is only normally done within the description of the schema for an interface. The fields of the given named resource are considered to be defined inline at the point of declaration - essentially, it's macro expansion.

resource_info

The Hoodoo::Presenters::Base subclass for the Resource in question, e.g. Product. The deprecated form of this interface takes the name of the type to nest as a symbol, e.g. :Product, in which case the Resource must be declared within nested modules Hoodoo::Data::Types.

options

Optional options hash. No options currently defined.

Example - an iterface takes an Outlet resource in its create action.

class Outlet < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    internationalised

    text :name
    uuid :participant_id, :resource => :Participant, :required => true
    uuid :calculator_id,  :resource => :Calculator
  end
end

class OutletInterface < Hoodoo::Services::Interface
  to_create do
    resource Outlet
  end
end

It doesn't make sense to mark a resource 'field' as :required in the options since the declaration just expands to the contents of the referenced resource and it is the definition of that resource that determines whether or not its various field(s) are optional / required. That is, the following two declarations behave identically:

resource Outlet

resource Outlet, :required => true # Pointless option!
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 636
def resource( resource_info, options = nil )
  options ||= {}

  if resource_info.is_a?( Class ) && resource_info < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
    klass = resource_info
  else
    begin
      klass = Hoodoo::Data::Resources.const_get( resource_info )
    rescue
      raise "Hoodoo::Presenters::Base\#resource: Unrecognised resource name '#{ resource_info }'"
    end
  end

  self.instance_exec( &klass.get_schema_definition() )
end
string( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON string with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true and mandatory :length => [max-length-in-chars]

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 346
def string( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::String, options )
end
tags( field_name, options = nil )

Declares that this Type or Resource has a string field of unlimited length that contains comma-separated tag strings.

field_name

Name of the field that will hold the tags.

options

Optional options hash. See Hoodoo::Presenters::BaseDSL.

Example - a Product resource which supports product tagging:

class Product < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    internationalised

    text :name
    text :description
    string :sku, :length => 64
    tags :tags
  end
end
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 437
def tags( field_name, options = nil )
  options ||= {}
  property( field_name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Tags, options )
end
text( name, options = {} )

Define a JSON string of unlimited length with the supplied name and options.

name

The JSON key

options

A Hash of options, e.g. :required => true

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 402
def text( name, options = {} )
  property( name, Hoodoo::Presenters::Text, options )
end
type( type_info, options = nil )

Declare that a nested type of a given name is included at this point. This is only normally done within an array or object declaration. The fields of the given named type are considered to be defined inline at the point of declaration - essentially, it's macro expansion.

type_info

The Hoodoo::Presenters::Base subclass for the Type in question, e.g. BasketItem. The deprecated form of this interface takes the name of the type to nest as a symbol, e.g. :BasketItem, in which case the Type must be declared within nested modules Hoodoo::Data::Types.

options

Optional options hash. No options currently defined.

It doesn't make sense to mark a type 'field' as :required in the options since the declaration just expands to the contents of the referenced type and it is the definition of that type that determines whether or not its various field(s) are optional or required.

Example 1 - a basket includes an array of the Type described by class BasketItem:

class Basket < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    array :items do
      type BasketItem
    end
  end
end

A fragment of JSON for a basket might look like this:

{
  "items": [
    {
       // (First BasketItem's fields)
    },
    {
       // (First BasketItem's fields)
    },
    // etc.
  ]
}

Example 2 - a basket item refers to a product description by having its fields inline. So suppose we have this:

class Product < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    internationalised
    text :name
    text :description
  end
end

class BasketItem < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    object :product_data do
      type Product
    end
  end
end

…then this would be a valid BasketItem fragment of JSON:

{
  "product_data": {
    "name": "Washing powder",
    "description": "Washes whiter than white!"
  }
}

It is also possible to use this mechanism for inline expansions when you have, say, a Resource defined entirely in terms of something reused elsewhere as a Type. For example, suppose the product/basket information from above included information on a Currency that was used for payment. It might reuse a Type; meanwhile we might have a resource for managing Currencies, defined entirely through that Type:

class Currency < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    string :curency_code, :required => true, :length => 8
    string :symbol, :length => 16
    integer :multiplier, :default => 100
    array :qualifiers do
      string :qualifier, :length => 32
    end
  end
end

resource :Currency do
  schema do
    type Currency # Fields are *inline*
  end
end

This means that the Resource of Currency has exactly the same fields as the Type of Currency. The Resource could define other fields too, though this would be risky as the Type might gain same-named fields in future, leading to undefined behaviour. At such a time, a degree of cut-and-paste and removing the type call from the Resource definition would probably be wise.

# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 577
def type( type_info, options = nil )
  options ||= {}

  if type_info.is_a?( Class ) && type_info < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
    klass = type_info
  else
    begin
      klass = Hoodoo::Data::Types.const_get( type_info )
    rescue
      raise "Hoodoo::Presenters::Base\#type: Unrecognised type name '#{ type_info }'"
    end
  end

  self.instance_exec( &klass.get_schema_definition() )
end
uuid( field_name, options = nil )

Declares that this Type or Resource _refers to_ another Resource instance via its UUID. There's no need to declare the presence of the UUID field _for the instance itself_ on all resource definitions as that's implicit; this uuid method is just for relational information (AKA associations).

field_name

Name of the field that will hold the UUID.

options

Options hash. See below.

In addition to standard options from Hoodoo::Presenters::BaseDSL, extra option keys and values are:

:resource

The name of a resource (as a symbol, e.g. :Product) that the UUID should refer to. Implementations may use this to validate that the resource, where a UUID is provided, really is for a Product instance and not something else. Optional.

Example - a basket item that refers to an integer quantity of some specific Product resource instance:

class BasketItem < Hoodoo::Presenters::Base
  schema do
    integer :quantity, :required => true
    uuid :product_id, :resource => :Product
  end
end
# File lib/hoodoo/presenters/base_dsl.rb, line 470
def uuid( field_name, options = nil )
  options ||= {}
  property(field_name, Hoodoo::Presenters::UUID, options)
end